PRACTICING THE ART OF JIN SHIN JYUTSU: Frequently Asked Questions

I have been to a number of 5-day classes, and have been noticing that there are some questions that often are asked by people who take the 5-day class for the first time, about when they can start getting clients, what to charge, and so on. Some of these questions are answered here by David Burmeister, director of the Jin Shin Jyutsu institute in Scottsdale:

FAQ

1. When am I able to practice Jin Shin Jyutsu on a professional basis and refer to myself as a Jin Shin Jyutsu student practitioner?

Answer: First of all, we encourage you to use your jumper cables with friends and family members from the beginning. However, since such a volume of material is covered in the seminar, and no test is given to measure one’s understanding, we feel that we cannot certify any student practitioner’s abilities. What we provide is a certificate of attendance after completing your first and third 5-Day basic seminars. If you choose to practice the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu on others, please be aware that you are fully responsible for your own actions. Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any type of loss or injury to you or to others. Many student practitioners purchase liability insurance. One insurance source is the ABMP, as mentioned in our brochures. We encourage new students not to hurry through the process of completing their first three classes. Generally, a period of approximately 18 months is the minimum suggested amount of time recommended to complete your first three 5-Day basic seminars. If you intend to practice professionally, we encourage regular attendance of our classes and recognize the need for experience before one begins a practice. Please check with your state and local authorities regarding what is required to practice this type of modality in your community.

2. Is a Jin Shin Jyutsu certificate the same as a license?

Answer: No. The certificate issued by Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. is a certificate of attendance, certifying that you attended a minimum number of classes. The certificate does not constitute a license, such as those required by state or municipal governments for massage therapists. Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. does not test for proficiency nor do background checks on its students. As mentioned above, please check with your state and local authorities.

3. What should I charge for a Jin Shin Jyutsu session?

Answer: Fees charged for a Jin Shin Jyutsu session tend to vary according to the location and experience of the student practitioner. (For instance, Mary Burmeister’s associates at the Scottsdale office charge $75 per session.) Factors such as license and permit costs, local cost of living, expenses for an office, and the extra expense of house calls can all influence a student practitioner’s fee. (Also, we have found that Jin Shin Jyutsu practiced at luxury resorts and health spas is often priced much higher than fees of a private student practitioner.) Keeping all of this in mind, we encourage student practitioners to keep prices affordable, because modest pricing (and even a sliding scale) keeps Jin Shin Jyutsu more accessible.

4. What terminology is appropriate to use as a student practitioner?

Answer: Mary Burmeister and Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. do not use terms, concepts, and practices that are closely associated with the medical profession, such as “therapy,” “diagnosis,” etc. We do not make claims to “cure” or to be a substitute for appropriate medical care. Indeed, the use of such terms or the making of such claims may be illegal. However, we believe Jin Shin Jyutsu profoundly supports the healing process of body, mind and spirit, and is a valuable complement to, not necessarily a replacement for, conventional healing methods.

5. Can I use the name Jin Shin Jyutsu and its Kanji (Japanese characters) on my business card?

Answer: The name Jin Shin Jyutsu and the Kanji are valuable assets of Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. and serve to identify and distinguish the Art brought to us by Master Jiro Murai and Mary Burmeister from other modalities which are practiced by people who neither understand nor share our values and teachings. It is our policy to allow the limited use of our above registered name and logos to those who have completed the five-day basic seminar at least three times with the understanding that the student practitioner is wholly responsible for his or her actions and will indemnify Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. and its affiliates from any and all liability to the student practitioner and third parties.

When using the name Jin Shin Jyutsu and the Kanji, always identify them with the trademark symbol ®, and use them only in connection with the practice of the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu as given to us by Master Jiro Murai and Mary Burmeister. We encourage qualified student practitioners to use the logos on stationery, business cards, promotional flyers, etc., together with the trademark symbol. Of course, Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. reserves the right to revoke the right to use any of the registered trademarks if the marks are not being used in a manner consistent with the Blessings of the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu or do not meet Jin Shin Jyutsu’s standards of quality, or for other reasons which are in the best interest of Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc.

6. How may I inform people about Jin Shin Jyutsu?

Answer: Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. has a practitioner information brochure used to introduce Jin Shin Jyutsu to others. We also have introductory materials such as The Touch of Healing, Mary Burmeister’s 3 Self-Help books, and TheArt of Living video. You are not permitted to copy or otherwise reproduce any of our materials without our written consent to do so. We will happily permit you to write and publish articles in your community, provided that we are given the opportunity in advance to review and approve those articles. Public speaking about Jin Shin Jyutsu and offering Self-Help classes are excellent ways to introduce Jin Shin Jyutsu to others.

7. Who is authorized to teach Jin Shin Jyutsu?

Answer: Currently Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. has contracted and authorized twenty-three instructors to present Jin Shin Jyutsu materials, including Text 1 & 2. The currently authorized instructors are: Muriel Carlton, Philomena Dooley, Wayne Hackett, Cynthia Broshi, Petra Elmendorff, Carlos Gutterres, Sara Harper, Ian Harris, Mona Harris, Jennifer Holmes, Iole Lebensztajn, Nathalie Max, Birgitta Meinhardt, Jill Marie Pasquinelli (Holden), Waltraud Riegger-Krause, Matthias Roth, Jed Schwartz, Susan Schwartz, Margareth Serra, Carlyse Smyth, Michael Wenninger and Anita Willoughby. The above-mentioned individuals are the only instructors (of text materials), other than Mary Burmeister, recognized by Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc. Therefore, as discussed in the Presenting Self-Help Classes section below, those qualified students may teach others to perform Self-Help utilizing Jin Shin Jyutsu but are not permitted to teach anyone to perform Jin Shin Jyutsu on others or from the text books.

PRESENTING SELF-HELP CLASSES

1. At what point can I help others through a Self-Help class?

Answer: We believe a Self-Help class should be facilitated only by students who have at least a basic understanding of the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu. We have found that students who have completed the 5-Day Basic Seminar at least 3 times along with the Living the Art Seminar at least once generally have the basic understanding necessary to facilitate Self-Help classes using Mary Burmeister’s three Self-Help books. The prerequisite for teaching Jin Shin Jyutsu Self-Help is a minimum of three 5-Day basic seminars and one Living The Art (LTA) class.

2. Are there any other considerations I should know about before presenting Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu to others?

Answer: Please use our name and trademark properly when producing brochures or flyers about your class. We do ask that you clearly refer to yourself as a Self-Help instructor (preferably including the words “Self-Help” in the title). Please contact the Scottsdale office if you have any questions.

If you present a Self-Help class, please communicate to students that, while this instruction is intended to assist them in helping themselves (and perhaps friends and family), it is not intended to prepare them to practice Jin Shin Jyutsu on others or to share Jin Shin Jyutsu with others in a professional capacity (such as a student practitioner or instructor). We suggest that you make available the latest seminar calendar brochure to help students differentiate between the levels of training.

We thank you for your loving participation in sharing the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu. We know that our community will continue to flourish with your collective support and dedication.

Lovingly,

David Burmeister
Director, Jin Shin Jyutsu, Inc.

http://www.jsjinc.net/pagedetails.php?id=studypath&ms=1

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