Article from Max Goldberg: GMO Impossible Burger Tests Positive for Glyphosate

Another article in the never ending story about the importance of food, and what’s in it….

Article from Max Goldberg:
As Beyond Meat’s very successful IPO is bringing a lot of attention to the alt-protein category, it is important to take a look at what exactly are in these food products.

One popular name in this space is the Impossible Burger, a product we first wrote about in 2017 when Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) documents uncovered that the FDA disagreed with the company’s safety assessments of the burger’s main ingredient — soy leghemoglobin. However, the company continued selling it to the public anyhow without informing consumersabout the FDA’s very serious concerns.

The issue this time around with the Impossible Burger is the amount of glyphosate that it contains.

According to Moms Across America, who had the product tested at Health Research Institute Laboratories, the levels of glyphosate were 11x that of the Beyond Meat burger and the total result (glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA) came in at 11.3 parts per billion (ppb).

Why should consumers care about glyphosate?

Because glyphosate is known to the State of California to cause cancer and the World Health Organization says it is “probably carcinogenic to humans.” — which means that it “probably causes cancer to humans.” Glyphosate also happens to be the primary ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, and approximately 250 million pounds of this weed killer are sprayed each year in the U.S.

Recent court cases, including the $2 billion judgment to a couple whose non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was caused by Roundup, have provided more evidence of how harmful this chemical is.

So, the Impossible Burger not only contains a genetically-modified protein that has never been in the human diet until a few years ago, but it has also tested positive for glyphosate.

Additionally, company founder Pat Brown wrote the other day that the Impossible Burger will now be using GMO soy in its burgers. Genetically-modified soy is sprayed with Roundup and is one of Monsanto’s most important products.

“We are shocked to find that the Impossible Burger can have up to 11x higher levels of glyphosate residues than the Beyond Meat burger according to these samples tested. This new product is being marketed as a solution for ‘healthy’ eating, when in fact 11 ppb of glyphosate herbicide consumption can be highly dangerous. Only 0.1 ppb of glyphosate has been shown to alter the gene function of over 4,000 genes in the livers, kidneys and cause severe organ damage in rats. I am gravely concerned that consumers are being misled to believe the Impossible Burger is healthy,” said Zen Honeycutt, Executive Director of Moms Across America.

If you’re looking to switch to a vegan diet or consume less meat, there are numerous organic meatless options out there, such as Hilary’s Veggie Burgers or Don Lee Farms, products that are not genetically modified and whose ingredients have not been sprayed with glyphosate.

While the Impossible Burger may be generating a lot of hype and is Instagram-worthy because of how it “bleeds”, it carries elevated levels of glyphosate when compared to its non-organic peers, and its key ingredients are not found in nature but are manufactured in a laboratory.

Is eating the Impossible Burger a risk worth taking?

As the Institute for Responsible Technology has pointed out, GMOs carry many health risks.

But maybe Steven Molino (who now Tweets under @steven_molino) can answer this for us.

On Twitter, he said that 20 minutes after eating his first Impossible Burger at Bareburger, he “went into anaphylactic shock & taken to ER. Never happened to me before…” His Tweet about going into “anaphylactic shock” has since been deleted.

https://livingmaxwell.com/gmo-impossible-burger-glyphosate?fbclid=IwAR26ONCEL15DNOh1awXL01Q5hCtyHw90TSv9Sp7bfmezbJXiGBnHP2yAoDI

10 vegan foods packed with protein

Yummy! 🙂

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-health/10-vegan-foods-packed-with-protein/

Where do you get your protein? It’s a question that anyone who has given up meat or is cutting down is probabaly familiar with. Many people know that soy products such as tofu and tempeh are a great source of plant-based protein. They also understand that nuts, seeds and beans make up a bulk of our protein intake. Unfortunately, this leads some to think that all we eat is tofu and beans. This is simply untrue! Here’s a list of 10 vegan foods that are packed with protein.

1. Hummus

Hummus is loaded with protein, courtesy of its two main ingredients, garbanzo beans and tahini. Bored by the plain variety? Try some new hummus flavors that are out of the box, such as this Spicy Sweet Potato HummusFresh Pumpkin and Kale Hummus or Roasted Red Pepper Hummus. Looking for even more protein for your post-workout snack? Try spinach, tofu, avocado or black bean hummus. Get creative!

Wondering what to do with that leftover jar of homemade tahini? Fortunately, there are many other uses for it besides hummus. Sesame seed paste, or tahini, can be used in salad dressings, dipping sauces, baked goods, spreads and dips. Use tahini in place of mayonnaise in potato salad or Asian slaw. Another option is to make a warm dressing and serve it over steamed or grilled vegetables.

Garbanzo beans (also known as chickpeas) are extremely versatile. Read all about them in our Spotlight on Chickpeas. Look for garbanzo bean or chickpea flour in the grocery store. It can usually be found in the gluten-free section. Add it to baked goods for a creamy, rich flavor. The flour can also be used as a thickening agent for soups, sauces and gravies. The traditional Middle Eastern dish falafel is a delicious example of the use of chickpeas. They are also great on salads or simply baked as a snack. Toss them with a little olive oil and the seasonings of your choice. Bake in a 400º oven until golden and crispy. You now have a healthy alternative to popcorn! This Baked Falafel Salad is AMAZING!

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

2. Avocado

Avocado contains healthy, monounsaturated fats, which have been shown to slow brain aging. Avocado has also been shown to help protect against certain types of cancer, and are a great source of antioxidant vitamin E. They provide all 8 essential amino acids necessary for the body to form a complete protein. When most people think of avocados, the first thing that comes to mind is guacamole. While delicious, it’s not the only thing avocados are good for.

Try adding some avocado in your morning green smoothie. Trust us, it will add an unbeatable creamy texture. If you real fan then add it into an avocado ”alfedro” sauce for pasta or blend it into a soup like this delicious Raw Creamy Mushroom Soup with Avocado. Don’t forget about dessert, this amazing fruit can quickly turn into a superb creamy icing for any cake!

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

3. Pistachios

Pistachios are a low-calorie nut and are an excellent source of protein and fiber. A single ounce of roasted pistachio nuts delivers 13 percent of the recommended daily intake of protein and 12 percent of the recommended daily intake of fiber. A great way to use them is in homemade granola. Oats contain protein too. In fact, oat protein is almost equal in quality to soy protein. Add some soy or almond milk to the mix and you have a delicious, high-protein breakfast! Pistachios are also great in salads, pilaf, trail mix and desserts! For a twist, substitute pistachios for pine nuts in pesto. Don’t forget about pistachio pudding for dessert!

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

4. Quinoa

Quinoa contains significant quantities of essential vitamins and minerals including manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, and copper. A cup of cooked quinoa also contains 8 grams of complete protein and 5 grams of fiber! Read all about this superseed in our guide to Quinoa. Use it in place of rice for a much more nutritious side dish. Try it cold in a salad or warm in a burrito or pilaf and don’t forget to check out these amazing Quinoa Recipes.

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

 5. Chia Seeds

Remember those Chia Pet commercials you used to always see as a kid? Ch-ch-ch-chia! Yes, those are the chia seeds I’m referring to. Besides being a fun novelty item, chia seeds are also a protein powerhouse. Just 1 tablespoon of chia seeds contains 5 grams of fiber, 3 grams of protein, 2282 mg of Omega 3 and 752 mg of Omega 6 fatty acids! Read all about Chia seeds in our Chia Guide. You can blend the seeds into juice and smoothies, add them into soups, stews, and chillis, or roll the little guys into raw chocolate protein balls. They make a wonderful pudding, similar in consistency to tapioca, without needing to be cooked or use as a thickening agent for soups and gravies. Chia seeds also make a great egg substitute. You will need 1 tablespoon finely ground seeds and 3 tablespoons of water per egg called for in the recipe.

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

6. Green Peas

Eat your peas! Turns out, mom really did know what she was talking about. These little  guys contain about 8 grams of protein per cup. If you think you don’t like peas, try them fresh out of the garden. They are actually quite sweet. Still not convinced? Sneak them into stir fries, soups and salads. Or, go for the gusto with this raw pea soup. Our favorites are these two knock off pea dishes; the Sweet Pea Hummusand the Knock-off-amole!

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

7. Lentils

With about 30% of their calories from protein, lentils have the third-highest level of protein, by weight, of any legume or nut, after soybeans and hemp. Lentils are the easiest legumes to work with. They do not need to be soaked overnight and can be on your table in as little as 20 minutes.  While, soupsstews andsalads are common dishes that contain lentils. For your next cookout, try lentil veggie burgerslentil tacos or this out-of-the-world lentil loaf!

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

8. Hemp Seeds

The amino acid profile of hemp seeds is close to “complete” when compared to more common sources of proteins such as meat, milk, eggs and soy. Hemp protein contains all 21 known amino acids, including the 9 essential ones adult bodies cannot produce.  You can sprinkle them on just about anything. They impart a rich, nutty flavor. Try using hemp seed oil in your salad dressing  or hemp milk on your granola. Want to pump up the protein factor in your pesto? Try this killer Creamy Hemp Pesto.

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

9. Almonds

Almonds, like all nuts, are very high in protein. A 1/4 cup serving of almonds contains 8 grams of protein. You can add them to your cereal, salad, trail mix, or granola. My favorite way to use them is in almond butter (Check out this video guide on how to make it yourself!). Spread it on apple slices or toast and you have the perfect protein snack! Experiment with other nut butters such as cashew, pecan, macadamia or a combination. Be sure to try almond yogurt and almond cheese as well! Here are 10 amazing vegan recipes infused with almonds.

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein

10. Soy

A list of vegan foods packed with protein would not be complete without the mention of soy in some form. Try dry roasted edamame for a healthy snack on the go. We’ve seen them covered in dark chocolate, which would up your protein intake even more. Another thing to try is tofu noodles. They are great because the noodles are gluten-free, extremely low in calories and ready-to-eat. Think tofu is tasteless? Think again! Read this guide to learn how to cook with tofu, with some delicious recipes. Try serving them with an avocado “alfredo” sauce for a protein-packed meal. Just be sure you choose organic/non-GMO soy, and as with most foods, moderation is the rule.

10 Vegan Foods Packed with Protein  This shows that a well-balanced plant-based diet is anything but devoid of protein. It also doesn’t consist of eating the same thing every day. Share this list with all skeptics you know and maybe one day vegans will no longer be asked, “But where do you get your protein?”

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule
(here’s the link)

March 04, 2014

These days you can fly to far corners of the world and eat pretty much the same food you can get back home. There’s pizza in China and sushi in Ethiopia.

A new scientific study shows that something similar is true of the crops that farmers grow. Increasingly, there’s a standard global diet, and the human race is depending more and more on a handful of major crops for much of its food.

At the same time, all over the world, people are eating a bigger variety of foods. But until now, no one had crunched the numbers to see whether global diets were overall getting less — or more — diverse.

“We wanted to know, really, how many crops feed the world, and what’s happening with them,” says Colin Khoury, a visiting researcher at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, or CIAT, in Cali, Colombia.

Khoury and his collaborators went through 50 years of data collected by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. And they uncovered two big trends.

The first: “Hey, actually, there’s places where diets are diversifying, where they’re adding crops,” says Khoury.

In parts of Asia, such as China, rice is a declining portion of the average person’s diet as they add other foods that are now more available. In the U.S., meanwhile, people are eating more imported foods, like mangoes and coconut water.

But here’s the second discovery: Those bigger menus of food also are getting more and more similar to each other, from Nanjing to Nairobi. Everybody is relying more and more heavily on a few dozen global megafoods.

Many of those foods are part of what you’d call a standard Western diet, including wheat, potatoes and dairy. But other megacrops come from the tropics, such as palm oil. “It’s grown on a large scale in Malaysia and Indonesia, but it’s become a global commodity in diets essentially everywhere,” says Khoury.

Smaller crops, meanwhile, are getting pushed aside. Sorghum and millet, for instance, are grown quite widely around the world, but they’re losing out to corn and soybeans. Other small crops that you only find in certain areas could disappear altogether.

“In the Andes, aside from the potato, most of the rest of the traditional roots and tubers, crops like oca and maca, are declining in the amount of production and the amount of consumption,” says Khoury.

A lot of things are driving this trend, he says. There’s a rise in international trade, but also “people moving to cities, having more access to supermarkets, to fast food, having less time to cook, not having gardens.”

The trend toward greater dependence on fewer crops continues, Khoury says. And so do the risks. It’s dangerous to depend on just a few crops, because any one of them could be hit by some disaster, such as disease.

But governments and international organizations can still help to safeguard diversity in food sources. They can act to preserve the many genetic varieties of megacrops that still exist, and also preserve and encourage cultivation of minor crops, he says.

, a historian at the University of Texas and author of Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History, says it’s important to remember that what drives the rise and fall of crops is demand for them after they’ve been transformed into something mouth-watering. “They’re only interesting if they’ve been processed in some way,” she says.

Think of all the things people do with wheat, she says. “You can get bread. You can get flatbread. You can get cakes. You can get pie. You can get beer!”

That’s what turned wheat into a megacrop. Root crops, by contrast, were difficult to store, transport or process into interesting foods.

We could still turn some of these minor crops into attractive foods if there’s enough interest in them, she says. In fact, interest may be reviving.

Consumers in the U.S. and Europe are snapping up little-known tropical fruits and so-called ancient grains, like farro and quinoa. Perhaps some of those minor crops can get their own spot on the global menu.

 

8 foods people think are healthy (but aren’t)

This is a link from MindBodyGreen, interesting facts about food we might think are healthy, but are not so good… here’s the first words on the blogpost, then there are 8 slideshows you will find when you click on the link:

Between the mainstream media, the Food Pyramid, the gazillions of health blogs out there, and the premise that you can just walk into an organic store and anything you pull off the shelves will be healthy, it’s not hard to see why so many of us are confused as to what is actually healthy and what isn’t.
Being a wellness warrior is tricky business, and I don’t think anyone is exempt from falling into the trap of thinking something is healthy, only to find out later that it totally isn’t. Here are just some of the food items commonly confused thanks to clever marketing.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-9426/8-foods-people-think-are-healthy-but-arent.html

July 2020
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